Louisa Jamieson
Journal of Paramedic Practice, Vol. 7, Iss. 8, 07 Aug 2015, pp 386 - 392

Paramedics and ambulance staff are frequently in contact with patients with mental health diagnoses, whether this is the primary reason for contacting the emergency services, e.g. self-harm, crisis or suicide ideation; or, incidental to their primary clinical concern. Patients in mental health crisis can be challenging and demanding. Most paramedics will not have had specific guidance on identifying or understanding the features, aetiology and responses to treatment of patients with a diagnosis of borderline personality disorder. Borderline personality disorder is associated with a high risk of self-harm, risk-taking behaviour and suicide. Building a rapport with patients is often crucial to paramedics achieving optimum patient care. There are features of borderline personality disorder that may make rapport building more complex, and the establishment of trust harder for the clinician to achieve and maintain. There is potential for frustration and a lack of understanding to interfere with patient-centred care. In order to support patients with borderline personality disorder, ambulance staff need to be aware of the particular characteristics of this condition and the current best practice guidance.

Return to article listing

To view this article

information Please use the options below to create a subscription. If you have any queries about your account please contact our subscriptions department or telephone free 0800 137201 (UK callers only) or +44 (0)1722 716997 for callers outside the UK.

Existing users sign in Personal subscription Pay per article

Sign in