Does precedence trump in the origins of confidentiality?

Mark Woolcock
Saturday, December 2, 2017

Good clinical practice has to be entwined with good ethical practice. Therefore, it follows that the clinical acumen of a modern paramedic develops at the same rate as their moral and ethical practice. As a newer profession, paramedics have relied on rules and codes from others to help maintain this balance, but their ancient and basic structure fails to address the nuances of modern practice. The paramedic profession has required a heuristic approach, as well as relying on the precedent of modern laws and codes, to underpin practice while simultaneously recognising the limitations of oath-based principles. This response has been necessary to address the increasingly complex and complicated situations paramedics encounter in their clinical environment.

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